vdb

Did you over notice the “VDB” on Lincoln’s right shoulder?

It stands for Victor David Brenner, the designer of the Lincoln Penny.

Advertisements

years of accumulated fitness

Now I’m the last one to harp on physical fitness, but this quote really spoke to me.

I’m finding that years of accumulated fitness are — literally — money in the bank.

Over the last few years I’ve started to see more and more of my peers spending money — lots of money — fixing their health. They are not necessarily in terrible shape, but few of them are as active as I am. They suffer from knee problems. Back problems. Shoulder problems. Digestive problems. Prostrate problems. Osteoporosis. Insomnia. Arthritis. Diabetes. Memory loss. Cancer.

Looking for help, they invest in prescription drugs, medications, hormones, supplements, complicated tests, scans, chiropractor visits, podiatrist visits, procedures, body replacements, surgeries, chemo and radiation. Not to mention expensive health care insurance.

I’m 6’0″, 280 lbs, and 39 years old. Maybe I’ll start thinking about this.

create your own extended warranty

Extended warranties are almost always a bad idea.  An extended warranty is the protection plan offered to you when you buy some gadget or other.  Relative to the cost of the gadget, the extended warranty is pretty expensive, and you almost never get the opportunity to take advantage of it.

In other words, your gadget almost never breaks in the period of time covered by the extended warranty.  It may break early on, due to a manufacturing defect, in which case the plain vanilla warranty that comes standard will cover the repair.  Or it may break due to old age, which will be after the extended warranty period is expired.  Result?  You gave the company a bunch more of your money and didn’t get anything for it.

The problem is, declining the extended warranty makes you nervous.  What if it does break during the extended period?  Won’t you be upset you didn’t buy the warrant?

Try this.  Next time you are offered an extended warranty, ask what the cost is, but then decline the plan.  When you get home, take that amount of money and set it aside in your own “extended warranty” fund.  Do this every time you are offered a plan.  Eventually that fund will be really big, because you won’t ever need it.  You’ll save yourself the expense, you’ll earn interest, and if you ever do have a covered accident, you’ll have plenty of money to just buy yourself a new one.  Beauty, eh?

go ahead – gloat

The natural human instinct is to gloat.

You win a game of foosball, you gloat over your opponent. You get beat, you expect the winner to gloat.

You find a duffel bag with $1 million in small, unmarked bills, you can’t keep it to yourself. You buy things. You treat your friends. You take your closest friend, in strictest confidence, to the back closet where you stashed the loot – just to show it off.

You get a big promotion, you sell a manuscript, your son scores the winning touchdown. You gloat.

It’s also the reason there are so many movies and books where the bad guy has the good guy at gunpoint and says, “Since you’re going to die anyway, I might as well tell you everything…” And then he ties up all the loose ends in the story. The bad guy needs to good guy to understand exactly why he is going to lose, exactly why the bad guy is so brilliant.

Try it sometime. Next time you run into incredible good luck, or achieve some big accomplishment, try not to tell anyone. Try to keep it to yourself.

200 year plan

A while back I wrote about a five-year plan. Recently I’ve been challenged to take a bit longer view – I’ve started working on the 200 year plan. Whoa! Why 200 years? I’ll be long dead, and so will my children and grandchildren. In fact, I expect seven to eight generations will be following me in the next 200 years.

What will life be like in 2211? Will it be as different from 2011 as 2011 is from 1811? Will we finally have Jetson-style flying cars? Will we fly faster than light? Will my great-great-great-great-great-great-grandchildren still be suffering from the common cold? What will that eighth generation look like? How many people will be members of that generation? And more importantly, why should I put together a 200 year plan that proposes to teach that generation anything? What can I possibly teach somebody who won’t be born until after my name is long forgotten? What can someone 200 years ago teach me today?

200 year from now technology will be completely different; national boundaries will be different; moral, ethical, and cultural norms will be different. Even the world’s major religions, while they will probably still be around, will be very different. About the only thing that will be unchanged is human nature, which has been constant for millennia.

Humans will always be looking for happiness. We will always try to make the world better for ourselves and for our children (although maybe not for someone else’s children). We will always have the need to explore and invent. We will always feel the effects of love and hate, friendship and betrayal, birth and death.

Given the constantly changing state of the world, and the unchanging state of human nature, I’d like my progeny to know it’s not all about money. In fact, looking at a 200 year time line, money is almost useless, unless it is used to further human development and understanding. Money can’t buy love, friendship, or eternal life, but it can ease hunger, search for cures for incurable diseases, and establish colonies in outer space.

If you’re reading this in the 23rd century — Hi! I can’t tell you how to communicate with your “computers” or how to get from point A to point B in the least amount of time. But I can tell you to seek the things money can’t buy, and to use your money to help others seek the things money can’t buy.